A Graphic History of Quarter Midgets:

Cars From the 1950s to the Present

1/4 the Size Twice the Fun

This page is intended to show some of the variety in body styling that has passed through our sport over its history. It is by no means a complete history of quarter midget racing, but merely a mixture of my own memories as captured on film during my career, and a collection of additional styles provided by fellow racing enthusiasts. In as much as this page will be an ever evolving document, I gratefully accept additional information and photos from others who share similar memories.
Robert Kerr


Body styles: (Listed Alphabetically)


Click on small photo to get larger version

A&J:

A&J has been building cars since 1982, over that time they have built a large variety of body styles.

Photo courtesy of A&J sales literature



Ans Craft:

The Ans Craft quarter midget, was a short wheelbase, narrow, somewhat top-heavy race car. Sold by Ansen Automotive, which was owned by Louie Senter. Who was a sponsor of Indy cars for many years. They were more suited to dirt tracks, than to pavement. as with most quarter midgets of the 50's. The engine mount was above the rear axle. The front suspension was transverse leaf spring and the rear axle was mounted solidly to the frame by pillow block bearings. The car appears very similar to the old Racecraft cars.( information courtesy of Darryl Clarke)

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua

 

 



All American

Photo courtesy of All American sales literature


Mr. Goddard's current quarter midget is the Boomerang.

The Boomerang

Photo courtesy of Boomerang sales literature


Bose:

Photo courtesy of Bose sales literature

 


Bullrider Race Car

Photo courtesy of Bullrider Race Car sales literature


Butler:

Photo courtesy of Butler sales literature


Challenger:


Cheetah Chassis / Sherman Racing Ent.


Cherokee:

Built by Almond Automatic Equipment Co. 778 N. Georgia Ave., Azusa, Ca. around 1957

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua


DasCar:

The DasCar was a simple, but very effective quarter midget. Its center of gravity was lower than most other cars of the 1950's, and the front suspension was by fore and aft 1/4 elliptic leaf springs. Like most cars of that era, the rear suspension was by solidly mounted pillow block bearings. This little car handled so well, and stuck to the track so well, that it was the equal of the average fully suspended car of the era. ( information courtesy of Darryl Clarke)

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua


Deco:

The Deco body was designed and built by Detroit Continental, and Later by an employee who bought out the company. Deco production lasted from late 1968 until the early 70s. The Deco was based upon the Style of Indy car coming into fashion during that era.

This Deco was built in 1969. It was the second of a very limited number of Decos built. From its' initial debut in 1969 until we sold the car (2 owners) it was "Green 13", Generally considered bad luck in the racing community. Also a close look at the rear tire will reveal the Lipped-slicks, tires which had an extra lip of tread extending outside the sidewall.
Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr


DMC:

Dmc was built by the Device Motor Co. Inc. 12019 Vose Street, North Hollywood, Ca. around 1957. The frame is a welded, unitized tubular steel frame over a cast-extruded aluminum frame.

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua

 

 

Click on DMC for more Photo courtesy of Steve LeGras


FastTrack:

The FastTrack was built by George Goddard for many years, and did succeed the Goddard quarter midget. Mr. Goddard's current quarter midget is the Boomerang. His chassis design and quality have constantly improved for 30 years. The very popular Nervo 1900 quarter midget was based on the FastTrack design.

( information courtesy of Darryl Clarke)

Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr


Fiser:

The Fiser Chassis is built by Fiser Racing. As the Thunder Body was based on the Fiser Body, its' likeness can be seen in the Thunder photo. The unique difference between the Fiser and Thunder vehicles appears to be the fact that the ridge running down the nose of the Fiser eventually tapers to a point, the Thunder ridge has a nearly constant width and eventually tapers down to the hood height.

Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr


Goddard:

This red Goddard, is a 1970 model. The frame for this early Goddard, was tubular, and was formed by a large aircraft press, from one continuous piece of tubing. The suspension was somewhat crude, but the frame was light years of ahead of even the Kurtis in strength and rigidness. The yellow car in the background was a Kurtis FX, made about 1975. The Kurtis was driven by Jason Clarke, and the red Goddard by Andrea Clarke. (Both were second generation quarter midget drivers)

The following photo is one of a Goddard formerly owned by Darryl Clarke. Although slightly dark it can be seen in the photo how the roll cage protrudes through the front of the car.

Photo courtesy of Darryl Clarke


Hodge:

The Hodge is based heavily on the Stanley body style, based in part on Mr. Hodges former affiliation with the makers of the Stanley cars.


Hagemann:

Photo courtesy of Bob Sharp




Hollingsworth:


Hotsy Totsy:


Kurtis:

The Kurtis Chassis was built by Several owners between the Early to Mid 1950s and the 1980s.

This photo shows my late 60s Kurtis

Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr

This photo shows a mid 70s Kurtis with the fashionable side pods. As can be seen from this photo, Kurtis cars were the predominant car during this era

Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr


Kurtis 500:

The Kurtis 500 Body was one of the earliest versions of the Kurtis Roadster built by the Kurtis company.

This photo shows a 1958 Kurtis 500, with Frank and Arlen Kurtis standing alongside.

Photo courtesy of Darryl Clarke

This photo shows a Kurtis 500 driven by Darryl Clarke.

Photo courtesy of Darryl Clarke


Kurtis FEX:

The FEX Body was built by the Kurtis company, it was first manufactured in 1975.

Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr


Kurtis FX:

The FX Body was yet another slight variation of the Kurtis Roadster built by the Kurtis company. The "Side Pods" were originally called "Wings". This lead to later confusion, when "wings" (for down force were out-lawed)

Photo courtesy of Darryl Clarke


Kurtis Sidewinder:

The Sidewinder was built by Kurtis during the 1960's. It consisted of a standard Kurtis type body, with a teardrop shaped gas tank mounted on the left side of the tail section, and the engine mounted inside the nerf bar area on the left side of the driver.


Larc-Douglas:

one of the older brands in QMA, the first cars were produced around 1946/47. In their initial design the car had a unique front engine design, later models converted to the current rear-engine format.

Here Douglas Schiller (the Douglas in Larc-Douglas) works on the engine of his first Quarter Midget, a front engine car of his father's design.

Photo courtesy of Douglas Schiller

This 1950's Larc-Douglas car featured 4 wheel Hydraulic Brakes and a rear engine. This car is also indicated to be the only one built from the molds for this particular body.

Photo courtesy of Douglas Schiller

Photo courtesy of Douglas Schiller

These two photo's show a Larc-Douglas Offyette which is frequently on display at the Motorsports Hall of Fame in Novi Michigan, note the faux injectors and brake pump on the left side of the car as well as the hood latches and faux exhaust pipe on the right side.

Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr

Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr


Lotus:


M&S-AGI:

A car from the 70's, this particular car started life as a Rice but was later outfitted with an M&S-AGI Body. The key players in the M&S venture were Don Mitchell and Dick Silva, both individuals are regular members of the QM mail-server.

Photo courtesy of Don Mitchell


Mantz:

Again an old car with a bit of the Race Craft image.

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua


The Midgeteer manufacturing: By Riverside Plastic Co.


Moss Midget:

The Moss Midget was produced in the 50s and possibly into the 60s, it featured independent front suspension with Rack & Pinion steering. The Moss was one a only a few cars to be produced during the hand-brake era. The body had an appearance similar to a squashed racecraft, with small wing-like protrusions near the front tires.

This photo shows a 1950s moss with its tail section removed, the hand brake is clearly visible alongside the STP sticker.

Photo courtesy of Robert Harmon


MR2:


Mark 1/4 quarter midget


Nervo/Coggins:

The Nervo/Coggin car (also known as a Nervo or N/C) is built by Nervo/Coggin Racing of Tallmadge Ohio. The car is generally identifiable by its one-piece rollbar assembly, Coil-over Shock absorbers, and the unique nose design of the cars body.

The nose is identified by an appendage which, viewed from above, looks like a profile of a bullet. The width of the appendage is nearly as wide as the body at it's rearmost point, and the forward-most body-line of the appendage proceeds down towards the nose at about a 45 degree slope. The Left side of the car also includes a small side-pod and the tail section carries the typical Racecraft design.

This photo shows a 1995 Nervo/Coggin owned by Joe Kiene & driven by Kash Kiene. Note the main hood line just above the number 224 on the nose of the car and the shallow angle of the nose appendage.

Photo courtesy of Joe Kiene


Orbit:

Looks like a Race Craft with a small snorkel on the hood.

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua


Pacemaker

Built by Track Master Inc. 15166 - G Raymer Street, Van Nuys, Ca. around 1957


Pacemaker roadster

 



Penny / Super Trac:

The Penny Is built by James "Penny" Paniagua.

This particular car was stolen, and its' owner Leo Bryant appreciates any assistance you can be in the retrieval of this car.

Photo courtesy of Leo Bryant


Racecraft:

The Racecraft was built during the 40s, 50s and possibly the early 60s. All of the original Racecraft's were built on a Rigid frame, and employed a left-side hand brake similar to those used by The Indy cars of the late 40s and early 50s. The Racecraft cars had an oval front grill with horizontal slots.

This photo shows a 1940s Racecraft parked alongside a Deco. This Racecraft employed a left-side hand brake until rules mandated a foot operated brake - Somewhere around 1972.

Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr

This photo shows a 1940s Racecraft on the left, and a 1950s Moss on the right. Both cars were equipped with standard hand-brakes at the time of this photo.

Photo courtesy of Robert Harmon


Rice:

Rice has been building cars since 1957. The 70's body was distinguishable by its round front similar to an older Moss and its Deco-like winged tail section

Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr

The current Rice offering has a more modern, more squared body style and comes with a choice of the original round tail or the square winged tail.

Photo courtesy of Ken Rice

Photo courtesy of Ken Rice


Royal Norseman (Royal -"250" Quarter Midget)

 

 

 

 

 

 


Speedway:

Another old car from James Paniagua's catalog.

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua


Spitfire:

An early car with a bit more of the Kurtis look from James Paniagua's catalog.

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua


Squalo:

An early car based on the grand prix cars of the day .

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua


Stanley:

I believe that construction of the Stanley body started around the time of my retirement from racing, somewhere in the mid to late 70s

This photo shows Jim Hartwells Stanley alongside a Rice. This photo was taken at the Washington track.

Photo courtesy of Jim Hartwell

This photo shows a more recent Stanley. The Stanley is fairly unique in that the nose appendage, while having a bullet shaped overhead view like the N/C cars, has a leading edge which is nearly vertical. The nose appendage appears almost like a submarines tower coming out of the nose of the car.

Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr

 

2001 Stanley

 


Superior Automotive:

Superior Automotive (AKA. Penny, AKA Super Trak) built this innovative hardtop model in 1973 unfortunately only 5 were built.

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua


Thunder:

The Thunder chassis is designed and built by NAMARS Midget driver Jim Hettinger. The Thunder Chassis factory first began building quarter midgets in 1995, and has manufactured 15 cars in their 14 month existence . The body style of the initial Thunder offering is based on the Fiser offering, however a new body has just been finished and will be available on all new cars. The most noticeable difference between the Fiser and Thunder Chassis is the coil-over front suspension on the Thunder vehicle. Newer Models will also include a Panhard Bar rear suspension.

Photo courtesy of Robert Kerr


Tiny Mite:

Another one of the cars from James Paniagua's old catalog.

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua


Tyler:

This photo shows a Tyler driven by Weston Crook. The Tyler quarter midget was built in Washington state, by Joe Ingersoll. It was based on the Stanley of the mid 70's , and was very solid and well built. Most of the four-cycle 1/2 midgets in the pacific northwest were Tyler's. ( information courtesy of Darryl Clarke)

Photo courtesy of Lance Crook


Viking Craft:

The Viking Craft quarter midget was built in Anaheim California, on the grounds of the Viking Trailer Co. Also on those grounds, was founded the "Jelly Bean Bowl" a very early quarter midget race track. This land at present, became part of the original area used for the construction of Disneyland.

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua


VOR:

An old roadster style car from the 50's. This picture was taken at Quartz Hill, CA

Photo courtesy of John Baker


Wahlborg:

Another of the early cars with something of a Kurtis Appearance.

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua

 

Darryl Clarke, driving the second quarter midget seen in the state of Alaska. Here, he is shown driving down the front of local stock car track, in an attempt to generate interest in the little cars. The efford had the desired effect, as the first quarter midget track in Alaska was built in the middle of this stock car track.(information courtesy of Darryl Clarke)

Photo courtesy of Darryl Clarke


Werner Lil Champ:

An old roadster style car from James Paniagua's catalog.

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua


West Kraft:

A car which looks amazingly like a Kurtis, built by Kiser Tooling in Urbana, OH.

Photo courtesy of James Paniagua

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This page maintained by Don Wood

This page last modified April 22, 2003 11:18 PM